Tuesday, October 14, 2008

PBS Interview with Kourosh Ziabari

Although Yahoo removed Iran from the drop-down list, Iranians were still using Yahoo services, according to Kourosh Ziabari, an Iranian journalist and blogger who wrote about the issue for the citizen journalism site OhMyNews.

"[Iranians are using] Yahoo services, downloading new versions of Messenger, using the different web site parts but not finding the name of their country in the sign-up list," Ziabari wrote. "In fact, if an Iranian user wanted to sign up for a new account in Yahoo mail, he should have selected the name of the other countries, and then he would proceed."

Ziabari and another blogger and student, Mohammad Tavakoli, organized an online campaign to protest the move by Yahoo to remove their country from the drop-down menu, which they considered "a mental war instead of a restriction of services" and an affront to their country's "15,000 years of history." The campaign consisted, ironically, of a Google bomb, a site whose metadata keywords don't actually describe the content and drive searchers looking for one site elsewhere -- in Ziabari's case to Hello Yahoo Mail. The site still shows up on the first page of Google search results for yahoo mail

After I queried another Iranian blogger, Hamid Tehrani, who edits the Iran section for Global Voices, I found out that Chrome is blocked, along with other Google downloads, in Iran. But it's relatively easy for Iranian users to get around this obstacle. Ziabari told me in an email (from his Gmail account) that he is still able to access Google services by using a proxy.

"Currently, we are using all of the search engines and portals without any restriction, using the latest versions of Google Earth, Chrome, GTalk and any other downloadable product," he said. In addition to helping users get around government filtering and censorship, proxies and anonymizers can also fool Google's servers into thinking that the downloads were going elsewhere rather than to users in Iran.


Continues here

3 comments:

Kourosh Ziabari said...

FrontPage Magazine

Jamie Glazov, Managing Editor

mailto:jglazov@rogers.com
========

http://www.mediahell.org/emailjournalists.htm

=======

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=200551101001

Kourosh Ziabari said...

FrontPage Magazine

Jamie Glazov, Managing Editor

mailto:jglazov@rogers.com
========

http://www.mediahell.org/emailjournalists.htm

=======

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=200551101001

chi said...

Google Chrome is blocked to Iran, Syria, Sudan, Cuba, and North Korea. Google just has to comply with US laws and regulations but I'm sure they unofficially encourage use by the free market using proxies and such.