Monday, January 26, 2009

We want the people to focus on Khayyam’s nationality: American curator



Kourosh Ziabari - Mehr News Agency:

: Harry Ransom Center, which is a cultural, artistic institution located in the University of Texas at Austin, announced last week that it will be inaugurating the exhibition of “Persian Sensation” from Feb 3 to Aug 2.
The exhibition of 200 items from the Ransom Center’s diverse collections introduces the unique cultural phenomenon of the “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”, which is a gnostic and mystical collection of Persian poems by the world renowned polymath and poem, Hakim Omar Khayyam, translated into English by Edward Fitzgerald in 1859.

In order to elicit the elaborated information on the details of exhibition, Tehran Times held an exclusive interview with Molly Schwartzburg, the Ransom Center’s curator of British and American literature and co-curator of the exhibition.

What follows is the complete text of an Internet interview with Mrs. Schwartzburg in which a variety of topics related to “Persian Sensation” and its probable impacts on public opinion and the cultural community of the U.S. is discussed.

Continue reading here

:

Iran is a wonderful country: NZ Journalist


A masterpiece of Persian Painting by the everlasting master of Iranian miniature, Mahmoud Farschchian



Kourosh Ziabari - Ovi Magazine:

: Over the years when talking to a foreign tourist who has come to my motherland for the very first time I've gotten used to hearing expressions such as "wow! I see you have restaurants in Iran!", or "Believe me Iran was not what I'd thought", "I never thought you had such a beautiful country" and so on.

For the global public opinions and the mass majority who do not have any particular way of knowing a distant land rather than relying on the information given to them by the mainstream media i.e. magazines, TV channels, news websites and radio stations, Iran would enthusiastically be the most astonishing and enticing place one can ever see and explore in his/her lifespan.

When switching between TV channels that perpetually hold piping-hot debates between their guests talking, not clashing about Iran's nuclear issue, you can see pictures of spacious, dry deserts with a sequence of camels running sluggishly, demolished buildings adjacent to the slums of downtown, ballistic missiles being test-fired, multitudinous hordes chanting political slogans while rallying in the covered streets and afterwards, some interlinked strings of nuclear power plants being shown from the aerial view.

What kind of perception one might catch from this partial and subjective "image-doctoring"? Undoubtedly, they would be convinced that the target country, which is Iran in this example, should be the most terrific and scaremonger chain in the "axis of evil" and full of terrorists, atomic bomb arsenals and a forgotten land, as well.

That's why nearly all of those foreign, specifically western visitors who come to Iran for various purposes become perplexed and confused by what they see here; a bizarre confusion which begins from the early moment of their arrival in the airport and lasts until the final seconds of their bidding farewell with the "Ancient Persia".

Less people, except those who are in favor of unveiling the truth by researching regularly, are informed that Iran is the same country of "Persia" with 15,000 years of ancient history and civilization, a monarchy that someday was gaining dominance over India to Egypt as the largest territory of all times, where Cyrus the Great has flourished and where the most remarkable personalities of science, literature and arts came from; Mevlana and Khawrizmi to Rhazes and Avicenna, Ferdowsi and Hafez to Khayyam and Rudaki.

Less people know that Iran is the land of Persepolis, Pasargadae and Apadana, the land of oldest known human civilization on the earth and the land of "Persian Gulf", but they know well that Iran is "the axis of evil"! The prevalence of such assumptions has no reason but the dominance of treacherous, dishonest and malicious media that feed the public opinions with duplicity, doubtfulness and misinformation.

However, I believe that awakened, conscious people, who could still be found somewhere in the world, have an ethic duty of impeding the widespread expansion of such untruths and falsifications by divulging the reality and propagating it worldwide.

To do so, on behalf of myself and at least about my country, I derived the most possible benefits from an opportunity which has occurred last month and helped me conduct an interview with a non-Iranian journalist who had traveled to Iran for a same goal of mine: understanding the reality of Iran.

Jill Worrall is a well-known New Zealander travel journalist and international tour-guide who has co-written several books on the profile of her own country such as "Landscapes of New Zealand" and "Coastlines of New Zealand" with the patronage of her husband, moreover she is intending to write an elaborate book about her observations of Iran.

She writes a regular column in New Zealand Herald, which is the most prominent newspaper of the country, in which she tells the stories of her miscellaneous travels to different parts of the world as a regular wanderlust!

In the November 2008, she made her second trip to Iran heading a group of 29 other New Zealander tourists who voyaged to most of the important cities of Iran including Tehran, Yazd, Shiraz, Isfahan, Mashhad, Rasht, Qom, Ahvaz, and Kashan.

Pursuant to my prior liaisons with her husband, to whom I should express my warmest thanksgivings for the immense help he has provided, I conducted a detailed interview with Jill Worrall and questioned a load of challenging topics focused on Iran from the viewpoint of a non-Iranian visitor.

Following is the complete text of our conversation in which a number of delicate and interesting remarks could be implied if a minimum of talent and astuteness is employed.

Let's add that when in the first question, I called Jill a famous travel writer, she denied submissively with a humble compliment and told that maybe she will become one day "Inshaallah", but not know!

Continue reading here

:

Monday, January 12, 2009

Israel is the most racist society: American singer

Kourosh Ziabari - Tehran Times: David Rovics is a world-renowned American folk singer and political activist from the small, northeastern state of Connecticut. He encourages the free distribution of his work by all non-profit means to help spread his anti-war, anti-occupation message.

Rovics has strong anti-Zionist, anti-Imperialist feelings and is an advocate of peace in the Middle East without the intervention of external forces. He has performed several concerts worldwide and dedicated their interests, benefits to the oppressed people of Palestine. What follows is the complete text of Tehran Times’s exclusive interview with David Rovics, discussing the grievous, uncivilized incursion of Israeli forces into the besieged Gaza strip and the massacre of innocent people there.



Thursday, January 08, 2009

Promoting Mutual Understanding



Kourosh Ziabari and Dave Eriqat: This interview is a grassroots effort to promote understanding between the people of two countries, the United States and Iran. Obviously, the governments of those two countries have been at odds with one another for quite some time, but how do the people of each country feel? Speaking for Americans, I think we harbor many misconceptions about Iran and Iranians, which leads to a fearful frame of mind that’s easily exploited by our “leaders.” So my goal with this project is to perhaps enlighten Americans about who Iranians are.
This project was inspired by young Kourosh in two ways. First, I read an essay of him titled something like Inviting Americans to Iran, which led me to contact him. Oddly enough, his essay seems to have vanished from that website, so I cannot provide a link to the essay. After I contacted him he gathered the mistaken impression from my own writing that I was some kind of journalist with a wide following, and invited me to interview him! Despite my correcting him about my true humble stature, we decided to do this project anyway. Ironically, Kourosh is the real journalist, not I!

Dave Eriqat

Tuesday, January 06, 2009

The heat of Israel condemnation in New Zealand

 

Over 1000 Palestinian supporters marched through central Wellington today in protest against Israel's bombardment of Gaza.
They were protesting against Israel's air and ground offensive in Gaza and called on the New Zealand Government to end its neutral stance.

Gaza health officials reported that since the campaign began on Dec. 27 more than 550 Palestinians have been killed and 2,500 wounded, including 200 civilians
Speaking to march supporters today, Green MP Keith Locke said the people of New Zealand wanted their Government to take action.

He said the Government was hypocritical if it did not speak up against the "terrorist attacks" on the people of Gaza.

"Our Government should speak the truth.
"What we have to do is not sit on the sidelines ... we must be part of a coalition of the peaceful in this world."

The protesters delivered a letter to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade office on Lambton Quay and marched to Civic Square chanting to a drum beat, clapping and waving signs.

The group included business people on lunch breaks, students and families.
Inspector Simon Perry said the group was well behaved, had liaised with police prior to the march and had stuck to the bus lanes.

He said the group was "considerably larger" than expected. 
Protest spokeswoman Serena Moran said "most other governments" had condemned the Israeli invasion.

"(Foreign Affairs Minister) Murray McCully is washing his hands of the horrendous Palestinian suffering in Gaza." Mr McCully said earlier the Government "is not prepared to choose sides".

Mr McCully said the Government's stance was in line with the international community, including the United Nations and European Union.
Labour's foreign affairs spokeswoman Helen Clark expressed concern that the United Nations Security Council had been unable to agree on a further call for a ceasefire to hostilities in Gaza.

"There is no road to peace between Israel and the Palestinians through this conflict in Gaza, but rather a deepening polarisation between the two sides which makes it even more difficult for a long term settlement to be achieved."

Israel today ignored mounting international calls for a cease-fire, saying it wouldn't stop its crippling 10-day assault until "peace and tranquility' are achieved in southern Israeli towns in the line of Palestinian rocket fire.

The Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand said it had "deep concern" about the Israeli attacks on Gaza.

It called on the Government and other world leaders to "come out strongly to censure Israel".
New Zealand's current stance was "shameful", it said.
Waikato Jewish Association spokesman Beni Tobias said the Israeli government was doing what was necessary to protect its citizens, and that its actions were justified by international law.

UK PMs Condemn Israeli Offensive into Gaza



HUNDREDS of protesters gathered on the steps of Bolton Town Hall last night to voice their anger at the fighting in Gaza.
More than 600 people chanted and waved banners as they condemned Israel’s actions as terrorism.

Protesters held aloft placards showing pictures of Arafat al Khawaja, a 21-year-old student who was shot dead in Gaza. They also used megaphones to shout pro-Gaza and anti-Israeli slogans, as well as “Gordon Brown — shame on you”.
There was a large police presence in Victoria Square to ensure that the event passed peacefully.

Officers, who had been expecting crowds of up to 4,000 people, watched from the edge of the square.
Brian Iddon, MP for Bolton South-east, and David Crausby, MP for Bolton North-east, attended the demonstration and addressed the crowd, expressing their support for Palestine and condemning killings by the Israeli government.
The event was organised by the Bolton Stop the War Coalition and the Bolton Council of Mosques.

Adopted from: Bolton News

Sunday, January 04, 2009

Films from 49 countries line up for Tehran's Fajr Festival



TEHRAN, Jan. 2 (Mehr News Agency) -- Foreign films from 49 countries will go on screen at the 27th Fajr International Film Festival which will be held from February 1 to 11, 2009 at various Tehran theaters. 
Nineteen countries from Asia, eighteen countries from Europe, seven countries from America, Four countries from Africa and one country from Oceania will screen their films during the gala.

The films, provided with Persian subtitles, will go on screen in several competitive sections of the festival, including International, Asia Cinema, and Spiritual Cinema and also in the non-competitive section of the festival.
This edition of festival will pay tribute to world-renowned cineastes and has dedicated sections to them.

Four Oscar-winning films by John Ford "The Quiet Man," "How Green Was My Valley," "The Grapes of Wrath" and "Stagecoach" will go on screen at the festival. 

The festival will also review films directed by renowned British filmmaker Mike Leigh in a section entitle "Mike Leigh, Political and social critic, like Ken Loach".

Born in 1943 in Britain, Mike Leigh is an English film and stage director, screenwriter, and playwright. Leigh began his career in the 1960s, and is often compared to filmmaker Ken Loach, who also makes social realism-orientated films that focus on the banal conflicts of everyday life of ordinary people. 
Some of his well-known films include "Life is Sweet," "Topsy Turvy" (1999), and the bleak working-class drama "All or Nothing" (2002). 

A section of the festival entitled "Silent but Alive" is dedicated to world filmmakers who lost their lives in 2008.
Films directed by late world filmmakers Anthony Minghella (Britain), Robert Mulligan (USA), Youssef Chahine (Egypt), Kon Ichikawa (Japan), Dino Risi (Italy) and Sydney Pollack (USA) will go on display at the festival.

The late American actor Paul Newman will be also be commemorated and several films in which Newman starred will go on display during the festival.
The festival will present Bollywood legend Amitabh Bachchan with a lifetime achievement award.

Saturday, January 03, 2009

Interview with Jill Worrall, New Zealander Journalist



Daves Travel Corner - Kourosh Ziabari : Over the years when talking to a foreign tourist who has come to my motherland for the very first time I've gotten used to hearing expressions such as "wow! I see you have restaurants in Iran!", or "Believe me Iran was not what I'd thought", "I was never thought you have such a beautiful country" and so on.

For the global public opinions and the majority of masses who do not have any particular way of knowing a far spot on the earth rather than relying on the information given to them by the mainstream media i.e. magazines, TV channels, news websites and radio stations, Iran would enthusiastically be the most astonishing and enticing place one can ever see and explore in his/her lifespan.

When switching between TV channels that perpetually hold piping-hot debates between their guests talking, not clashing about Iran's nuclear issue, you can see pictures of spacious, dry deserts with a sequence of camels running sluggishly, demolished buildings adjacent to the slums of downtown, ballistic missiles being test-fired, multitudinous hordes chanting political slogans while rallying in the covered streets and afterwards, some interlinked strings of nuclear power plants being shown from the aerial view.

What kind of perception one might catch from this partial and subjective "image-doctoring"? Undoubtedly, they would be convinced that the target country, which is Iran in this example, should be the most terrific and scaremonger chain in the "axis of evil" and full of terrorists, atomic bomb arsenals and a forgotten land, as well.

That's why nearly all of those foreign, specifically western visitors who come to Iran for various purposes get perplexed and confused by what they see here; a bizarre confusion which begins from the early moment of their arrival in the airport and lasts until the final seconds of their bidding farewell with the "Ancient Persia".

Less people, except those who are in favor of unveiling the truth by researching regularly, are informed that Iran is the same country of "Persia" with 15,000 years of ancient history and civilization, a monarchy that someday was gaining dominance over India to Egypt as the largest territory of all times, where Cyrus the Great has flourished and where the most remarkable personalities of science, literature and arts came from; Mevlana and Khawrizmi to Rhazes and Avicenna, Ferdowsi and Hafez to Khayyam and Rudaki.

Less people know that Iran is the land of Persepolis, Pasargadae and Apadana, the land of oldest known human civilization on the earth and the land of "Persian Gulf", but they know well that Iran is "the axis of evil"! The prevalence of such assumptions has no reason but the dominance of treacherous, dishonest and malicious media that feed the public opinions with duplicity, doubtfulness and misinformation.

However, I believe that awakened, conscious people, who could still be found somewhere in the world, have an ethic duty of impeding the widespread expansion of such untruths and falsifications by divulging the reality and propagating it worldwide.

To do so, on behalf of myself and at least about my country, I derived the most possible benefits from an opportunity which has occurred last month and helped me conduct an interview with a non-Iranian journalist who had traveled to Iran for a same goal of mine: understanding the reality of Iran.

Jill Worrall is a well-known New Zealander travel journalist and international tour-guide who has co-written several books on the profile of her own country such as "Landscapes of New Zealand" and "Coastlines of New Zealand" with the patronage of her husband, moreover she is intending to write an elaborate book about her observations of Iran.

She writes a regular column in New Zealand Herald, which is the most prominent newspaper of the country, in which she tells the stories of her miscellaneous travels to different parts of the world as a regular wanderlust!

In the November 2008, she made her second trip to Iran heading a group of 29 other New Zealander tourists who voyaged to most of the important cities of Iran including Tehran, Yazd, Shiraz, Isfahan, Mashhad, Rasht, Qom, Ahvaz, and Kashan.

Pursuant to my prior liaisons with her husband, to whom I should express my warmest thanksgivings for the immense help he has provided, I conducted a detailed interview with Jill Worrall and questioned a load of challenging topics focused on Iran from the viewpoint of a non-Iranian visitor.

Following is the complete text of our conversation in which a number of delicate and interesting remarks could be implied if a minimum of talent and astuteness is employed.

Let's add that when in the first question, I called Jill a famous travel writer, she denied submissively with a humble compliment and told that maybe she will become one day "Inshaallah", but not know!